Wednesday, April 01, 2009

Tamper Data: CSRF examined

I've been picking on web applications with CSRF vulnerabilities a great deal lately, and in so doing thought it timely to discuss one of my favorite tools for the task in a toolsmith article.
Tamper Data: CSRF Examined explores Adam Judson’s Tamper Data, the Firefox add-on, as one of the best tools for sniffing out CSRF holes. It allows you to quickly note the absence of token/formkey use, and uncover variables useful in crafting scripts to present vendors and vulnerability clearinghouses with proofs of concept.
Jeremiah Grossman referred to CSRF as the sleeping giant years ago but apparently no one's listened. ;-)
I can tell you, my research indicates that it remains a prevailing flaw. It's also difficult vulnerability to scan for, so most PCI ASVs miss it completely. If you have doubts about CSRF holes and PCI compliance (see PCI DSS 1.2 6.5.5) you need only read Mike Bailey's perspective over at skeptikal.org where he discussed the issue in cPanel almost a year ago and has since exposed the issue in Zen Cart, after a discussion we had regarding CSRF issues in osCommerce.
The following are all CSRF (and other vulnerabilities) discovered with Tamper Data, and disclosed via advisories employing responsible disclosure practices.
HIO-2008-1005 CompactCMS 1.1 XSS & CSRF
HIO-2008-1022-1 RateMe 1.3.3 XSS & CSRF
HIO-2009-0128 osCommerce CSRF
HIO-2009-0305 e107 Multiple e107_admin CSRF & XSS Vulnerabilities
HIO-2009-0308 dotProject 2.1.2 CSRF & multiple XSS
I also have many more similar vulnerabilities waiting in the pipeline for vendor repairs.

If you don't use it already, may I suggest installing Tamper Data at your earliest convenience?

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1 comment:

the system said...

PCI ASVs aren't so concerned with web application security as they are with network and OS security, so no wonder most of them don't pickup on CSRF.
PCI DSS does not necessitate an ASV to conduct web application security testing.