Posts

Showing posts from 2016

The DFIR Hierarchy of Needs & Critical Security Controls

Image
As you weigh how best to improve your organization's digital forensics and incident response (DFIR) capabilities heading into 2017, consider Matt Swann's Incident Response Hierarchy of Needs. Likely, at some point in your career (or therapy 😉) you've heard reference to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. In summary, Maslow's terms,  physiological, safety, belongingness & love, esteem, self-actualization, and self-transcendence, describe a pattern that human motivations generally move through, a pattern that is well represented in the form of a pyramid.
Matt has made great use of this model to describe an Incident Response Hierarchy of Needs, through which your DFIR methods should move. I argue that his powerful description of capabilities extends to the whole of DFIR rather than response alone. From Matt's Github, "the Incident Response Hierarchy describes the capabilities that organizations must build to defend their business assets. Bottom capabilities a…

Toolsmith - GSE Edition: Image Steganography & StegExpose

Image
Cross-posted on the Internet Storm Center Diary.

Updated with contest winners 14 DEC. Congrats to:
Chrissy @SecAssistance
Owen Yang @HomingFromWork
Paul Craddy @pcraddy
Mason Pokladnik - Fellow STI grad
Elliot Harbin @klax0ff

In the last of a three part (Part 1-GCIH, Part 2-GCIA) series focused on tools I revisited during my GSE re-certification process, I thought it'd be timely and relevant to give you a bit of a walkthrough re: steganography tools. Steganography "represents the art and science of hiding information by embedding messages within other, seemingly harmless messages."
Stego has garnered quite a bit of attention again lately as party to both exploitation and exfiltration tactics. On 6 DEC 2016, ESET described millions of victims among readers of popular websites who had been targeted by the Stegano exploit kit hiding in pixels of malicious ads.
The Sucuri blog described credit card swipers in Magento sites on 17 OCT 2016, where attackers used image files as…

Toolsmith - GSE Edition: Scapy vs CozyDuke

Image
In continuation of observations from my GIAC Security Expert re-certification process, I'll focus here on a GCIA-centric topic: Scapy. Scapy is essential to the packet analyst skill set on so many levels. For your convenience, the Packetrix VM comes preconfigured with Scapy and Snort, so you're ready to go out of the gate if you'd like to follow along for a quick introduction.
Scapy is "a powerful interactive packet manipulation program. It is able to forge or decode packets of a wide number of protocols, send them on the wire, capture them, match requests and replies, and much more." This includes the ability to handle most tasks such as scanning, tracerouting, probing, unit tests, attacks or network discovery, thus replacing functionality expected from hping, 85% of nmap, arpspoof, tcpdump, and others.
If you'd really like to dig in, grab TJ O'Connor'sViolent Python: A Cookbook for Hackers, Forensic Analysts, Penetration Testers and Security Engineer…

Toolsmith - GSE Edition: snapshot.ps1

Image
I just spent a fair bit of time preparing to take the GIAC Security Expert exam as part of the requirement to recertify every four years. I first took the exam in 2012, and I will tell you, for me, one third of the curriculum is a "use it or lose it" scenario. The GSE exam covers GSEC, GCIH, and GCIA. As my daily duties have migrated over the years from analyst to leadership, I had to "relearn" my packet analysis fu. Thank goodness for the Packetrix VM and the SANS 503 exercises workbook, offsets, flags, and fragments, oh my! All went well, mission accomplished, I'm renewed through October 2020 and still GSE #52, but spending weeks with my nose in the 18 course books reminded of some of the great tools described therein. As a result, this is the first of a series on some of those tools, their value, and use case scenarios.
I'll begin with snapshot.ps1. It's actually part of the download package for SEC505: Securing Windows and PowerShell Automation, but…

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Malware Information Sharing Platform (MISP) 2.4.52

7 OCT 2016 saw the release of MISP 2.4.52.
MISP, Malware Information Sharing Platform and Threat Sharing, is free and open source software to aid in sharing of threat and cyber security indicators.
An overview of MISP as derived from the project home page:
Automation:  Store IOCs in a structured manner, and benefit from correlation, automated exports for IDS, or SIEM, in STIX or OpenIOC and even to other MISPs.Simplicity: the driving force behind the project. Storing and using information about threats and malware should not be difficult. MISP allows getting the maximum out of your data without unmanageable complexity.Sharing: the key to fast and effective detection of attacks. Often organizations are targeted by the same Threat Actor, in the same or different Campaign. MISP makes it easier to share with and receive from trusted partners and trust-groups. Sharing also enables collaborative analysis, preventing redundant work. The MISP 2.4.52 release includes the following new features:

Toolsmith In-depth Analysis: motionEyeOS for Security Makers

Image
It's rather hard to believe, unimaginable even, but here we are. This is the 120th consecutive edition of toolsmith; every month for the last ten years, I've been proud to bring you insights and analysis on free and open source security tools. I hope you've enjoyed the journey as much as I have, I've learned a ton and certainly hope you have too. If you want a journey through the past, October 2006 through August 2015 are available on my web site here, in PDF form, and many year's worth have been published here on the blog as well.
I labored a bit on what to write about for this 10th Anniversary Edition and settled on something I have yet to cover, a physical security topic. To that end I opted for a very slick, maker project, using a Raspberry Pi 2, a USB web cam, and motionEyeOS. Per Calin Crisan, the project developer, motionEyeOS is a Linux distribution that turns a single-board computer into a video surveillance system. The OS is based on BuildRoot and uses m…

Best toolsmith tool of the last ten years

As we celebrate Ten Years of Toolsmith and 120 individual tools covered in detail with the attention they deserve, I thought it'd be revealing to see who comes to the very top of the list for readers/voters.
I've built a poll from the last eight Toolsmith Tools of the Year to help you decide, and it's a hell of a list.
@Mandiant's Memoryze (2008)@Paterva'sMaltego (2009)@SANSForensics' SIFT (2010)@zaproxy and @psiinon's OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (2011)@Modsecurity and @IvanRistic's Modsecurity for IIS (2012)@LaNMaSteR53Recon-ng (2013)@joshsokol's Simple Risk (2014)@beenuarHook Analyser (2015)  Amazing, right? The best of the best.

You can vote in the poll to your right, it'll be open for two weeks.

Toolsmith Tidbit: Will Ballenthin's Python-evtx

Image
Andrew Case (@attrc) called out Will Ballenthin's (@williballenthin) Python-evtx on Twitter, reminding me that I'm long overdue in mentioning it here as well.
Will's Python-evtx description from his website for same follows:
"python-evtx is a pure Python parser for recent Windows Event Log files (those with the file extension “.evtx”). The module provides programmatic access to the File and Chunk headers, record templates, and event entries. For example, you can use python-evtx to review the event logs of Windows 7 systems from a Mac or Linux workstation. The structure definitions and parsing strategies were heavily inspired by the work of Andreas Schuster and his Perl implementation Parse-Evtx."

Assuming you've running Python 2.7, install it via pip install python-evtx or download source from Github: https://github.com/williballenthin/python-evtx

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Kali Linux 2016.2 Release

Image
On the heels of Black Hat and DEF CON, 31 AUG 2016 brought us the second Kali Rolling ISO release aka Kali 2016.2. This release provides a number of updates for Kali, including:
New KDE, MATE, LXDE, e17, and Xfce builds for folks who want a desktop environment other than Gnome.Kali Linux Weekly ISOs, updated weekly builds of Kali that will be available to download via their mirrors.Bug Fixes and OS Improvements such as HTTPS support in busybox now allowing the preseed of Kali installations securely over SSL.  All details available here: https://www.kali.org/news/kali-linux-20162-release/
Thanks to Rob Vandenbrink for calling out this release. 

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Faraday v2.0 - Collaborative Penetration Test & Vulnerability Management Platform

Toolsmith first covered Faraday in March 2015 with Faraday IPE - When Tinfoil Won’t Work for Pentesting. As it's just hit its 2.0 release milestone, I'm reprinting Francisco Amato's announcement regarding Faraday 2.0 as sent via securityfocus.com to the webappsec mailing list.

"Faraday is the Integrated Multiuser Risk Environment you were looking
for! It maps and leverages all the knowledge you generate in real
time, letting you track and understand your audits. Our dashboard for
CISOs and managers uncovers the impact and risk being assessed by the
audit in real-time without the need for a single email. Developed with
a specialized set of functionalities that help users improve their own
work, the main purpose is to re-use the available tools in the
community taking advantage of them in a collaborative way! Check out
the Faraday project in Github.

Two years ago we published our first community version consisting
mainly of what we now know as the Faraday Client and a v…

Toolsmith In-depth Analysis: ProcFilter - YARA-integrated Windows process denial framework

Image
Note:Next month, toolsmith #120 will represent ten years of award winning security tools coverage.It's been an amazing journey; I look to you, dear reader, for ideas on what tool you'd like to see me cover for the decade anniversary edition. Contact information at the end of this post.

Toolsmith #119 focuses on ProcFilter, a new project, just a month old as this is written, found on Github by one of my blue team members (shout-out to Ina). Brought to you by the GoDaddy Engineering crew, I see a lot of upside and potential in this project. Per it's GitHub readme, ProcFilter is "a process filtering system for Windows with built-in YARA integration. YARA rules can be instrumented with custom meta tags that tailor its response to rule matches. It runs as a Windows service and is integrated with Microsoft's ETW API, making results viewable in the Windows Event Log. Installation, activation, and removal can be done dynamically and do not require a reboot."
Malware …

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.1 Preview

Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.1 Preview has been released to the Download Center. "WMF provides users with the ability to update previous releases of Windows Server and Windows Client to the management platform elements released in the most current version of Windows. This enables a consistent management platform to be used across the organization, and eases adoption of the latest Windows release." As posted to the Window PowerShell Blog and reprinted here: WMF 5.1 Preview includes the PowerShell, WMI, WinRM, and Software Inventory and Licensing (SIL) components that are being released with Windows Server 2016.  WMF 5.1 can be installed on Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008 R2, 2012, and 2012 R2, and provides a number of improvements over WMF 5.0 RTM including: New cmdlets: local users and groups; Get-ComputerInfoPowerShellGet improvements include enforcing signed modules, and installing JEA modulesPackageManagement added support for Containers,…

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Steph Locke's HIBPwned R package

Image
I'm a bit slow on this one but better late than never. Steph dropped her HIBPwned R package on CRAN at the beginning of June, and it's well worth your attention. HIBPwned is an R package that wraps Troy Hunt's HaveIBeenPwned.comAPI, useful to check if you have an account that has been compromised in a data breach. As one who has been "pwned" no less than three times via three different accounts thanks to LinkedIn, Patreon, and Adobe, I love Troy's site and have visited it many times.

When I spotted Steph's wrapper on R-Bloggers, I was quite happy as a result.
Steph built HIBPwned to allow users to:
Set up your own notification system for account breaches of myriad email addresses & user names that you haveCheck for compromised company email accounts from within your company Active DirectoryAnalyse past data breaches and produce reports and visualizations I installed it from Visual Studio with R Tools via install.packages("HIBPwned", repos=&qu…

Toolsmith Tidbit: XssPy

You've likely seen chatter recently regarding the pilot Hack the Pentagon bounty program that just wrapped up, as facilitated by HackerOne. It should come as no surprise that the most common vulnerability reported was cross-site scripting (XSS). I was invited to participate in the pilot, yes I found and submitted an XSS bug, but sadly, it was a duplicate finding to one already reported. Regardless, it was a great initiative by DoD, SecDef, and the Defense Digital Service, and I'm proud to have been asked to participate. I've spent my share of time finding XSS bugs and had some success, so I'm always happy when a new tool comes along to discover and help eliminate these bugs when responsibly reported.
XssPy is just such a tool.
A description as paraphrased from it's Github page:
XssPy is a Python tool for finding Cross Site Scripting vulnerabilities. XssPy traverses websites to find all the links and subdomains first, then scans each and every input on each and every…

Toolsmith Feature Highlight: Autopsy 4.0.0's case collaboration

Image
First, here be changes.
After nearly ten years of writing toolsmith exactly the same way once a month, now for the 117th time, it's time to mix things up a bit.
1) Tools follow release cycles, and often may add a new feature that could be really interesting, even if the tool has been covered in toolsmith before.
2) Sometimes there may not be a lot to say about a tool if its usage and feature set are simple and easy, yet useful to us.
3) I no longer have an editor or publisher that I'm beholden too, there's no reason to only land toolsmith content once a month at the same time.
Call it agile toolsmith. If there's a good reason for a short post, I'll do so immediately, such as a new release of feature, and every so often, when warranted, I'll do a full coverage analysis of a really strong offering.
For tracking purposes, I'll use title tags (I'll use these on Twitter as well):
Toolsmith Feature Highlightnew feature reviewsToolsmith Release Advisoryheads u…