Sunday, April 26, 2009

Cloud security commentary falling down on the job

This one made me quite angry in February, but I chose to let it go, with the exception of posting a comment.
Then, recently, I stumbled across it again on Network World and PCWorld and, given that they've taken to regurgitating such inanity, I simply couldn't pass it by again.
Here's the crux of it.
At IDC's Cloud Computing Forum, much mention was made of how much security concerns in the cloud are overblown.
Really?
Brilliant commentary such as follows seemed to be in abundance:
"I think a lot of security objections to the cloud are emotional in nature, it's reflexive," said Joseph Tobolski, director for cloud computing at Accenture. "Some people create a list of requirements for security in the cloud that they don't even have for their own data center."
Yes, Joseph, but here's a secret for you. In their data center at least they can be responsible for security flaws and mitigate accordingly. In the cloud they depend on someone else to address security problems, and if that provider is slow to respond, who knows what mayhem may ensue.
Data breach anyone? Loss of customer confidence?
Yeah, go ahead and blindly trust your reputation to the cloud, complete with everyone at the IDC forum singing its praises and throwing all the key buzzwords around.
It'll be OK...good luck with with that.
Statements from Accenture such as "security objections to the cloud are emotional in nature, it's reflexive" leave me shaking my head in wonder.
Seems like Accenture is really falling down on the job here.
Wait, they really are falling down on the job here. ;-)
This Accenture swf should only load whitelisted, known good Accenture Flash video files.
But it doesn't. It loads any FLV you like, such as this one.
As I said, falling down on the job. ;-)
So, before consuming the wisdom Accenture seems to be throwing about so freely, perhaps suggest that they pay attention to their own security before telling us that cloud security fears are overblown.

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